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From The Oxfordian: Excellent Article Summarizing the Case for Oxford as Shakespeare Now Available Online

This excellent article, written by longtime Shakespeare Oxford Society member Ramon Jiménez, is must reading for anybody with an interest in Shakespeare generally and the Shakespeare Authorship Question in particular.  I’m pasting below a few of paragraphs from Ramon’s compelling article. A link is provided below so you can read the entire article which was recently posted on the Shakespeare Oxford Society’s website:

The Case for Oxford Revisited
Ramon Jiménez

In his recent biography of William Shakespeare, the critic Jonathan Bate writes: ‘Gathering what we can from his plays and poems: that is how we will write a biography that is true to him’ (xix). This statement acknowledges a widely recognized truth—that a writer’s work reflects his milieu, his experiences, his thoughts, and his own personality. It
was the remarkable gap between the known facts about Shakespeare of Stratford and the traits and characteristics of the author revealed in the Shakespeare canon that led an English schoolmaster to suppose that the real author was someone else, and to search for him in the backwaters of Elizabethan poetry.

This inquiry led him to conclude that ‘William Shakespeare’ was a nom de plume that concealed the identity of England’s greatest poet and dramatist, and that continued to hide it from readers, playgoers, and scholars for hundreds of years. In 1920, J. Thomas Looney published his unique work of investigative scholarship, demonstrating that the man behind the Shakespeare name and the Shakespeare canon was Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford (1550-1604).1 Since then, hundreds of books and articles have augmented the evidence that this unconventional nobleman and courtier not only wrote the plays and poems attributed to Shakespeare, but concealed the fact of his authorship throughout his life. It appears that after his death his descendants and those in their service deliberately
substituted an alternative author and fabricated physical and literary evidence to perpetuate the fable.

The web of evidence associating Oxford with the Shakespeare canon is robust and far-reaching, and grows stronger and more complex every year. Although he was recognized by his contemporaries as an outstanding writer of poetry and plays, he is the only leading dramatist of the time whose name is not associated with a single play. This fact, alone, about any other person would be sufficient to stimulate intense interest and considerable research. Yet the Shakespearean academic community has not only failed to undertake this research itself, it has willfully and consistently refused to allow presentations or to publish research on the Authorship Question by anyone who disputes the Stratford theory. What Oxfordian research it does not ignore, it routinely dismisses, usually with scorn and sarcasm, as unworthy of serious consideration.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

About Matthew Cossolotto

2 comments

  1. Sony Pictures has just launched a new trailer for the upcoming film, Anonymous.

    Experts have debated, books have been written, and scholars have devoted their lives to protecting or debunking theories surrounding the authorship of the most renowned works in English literature. Anonymous poses one possible answer to the age old question: Who really wrote the works of William Shakespeare?

    Here is the link to the trailer. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBmnkk0QW3Q&feature=channel_video_title

    Join us on the Facebook page for the latest updates on Anonymous: http://www.facebook.com/Anonymous

    Anonymous opens in theaters September 30.

    Thanks and have a great day!

    - The Sony Pictures Digital Marketing Team

  2. Dear all,

    Sony Pictures Entertainment is delighted to introduce a special LIVE! Webcast event opened to all. For decades, people have been debating on the authorship of Shakespeare’s amazing work. For this event, let’s trace back to the long lost history and join the discussion with Shakespeare fans from all over the world.

    ANONYMOUS LIVE WEBCAST WITH
    DIRECTOR ROLAND EMMERICH
    WRITER/PRODUCER JOHN ORLOFF
    AND HISTORIAN CHARLES BEAUCLERK
    ON THE SHAKESPEARE AUTHORSHIP DEBATE

    Wednesday, September 28 from 8:15 – 9:15pm PST

    Tune in for a heated debate regarding the Shakespeare Authorship Question as ANONYMOUS
    Director Roland Emmerich, the film’s Writer/Producer John Orloff and Historian/Writer/Lecturer Charles Beauclerk face off against UC Berkeley’s Professor Alan H. Nelson in a live webcast.

    The live stream details are as follows:

    WHERE: Live from UC Berkeley, watch the live webcast at:
    http://www.facebook.com/Anonymous
    WHEN: Wednesday, September 28 from 8:15 – 9:15pm PST
    WHO: Director Roland Emmerich, the film’s Writer/Producer John Orloff, Writer/Lecturer/Historian Charles Beauclerk and UC Berkeley Professor Alan H. Nelson

    ANONYMOUS will be released in theaters nationwide on October 28, 2011.

    ABOUT ANONYMOUS
    Set in the political snake-pit of Elizabethan England, Anonymous speculates on an issue that has for centuries intrigued academics and brilliant minds such as Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, and Sigmund Freud, namely: who actually created the body of work credited to William Shakespeare? Experts have debated, books have been written, and scholars have devoted their lives to protecting or debunking theories surrounding the authorship of the most renowned works in English literature. Anonymous poses one possible answer, focusing on a time when scandalous political intrigue, illicit romances in the Royal Court, and the schemes of greedy nobles lusting for the power of the throne were brought to light in the most unlikely of places: the London stage.

    The film is directed by Roland Emmerich, written by John Orloff, and produced by Roland Emmerich, Larry Franco, and Robert Léger.

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